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August is last month to treat ash trees until spring – Town of Oakville

Town of Oakville completes treatment of almost 2,700 ash trees

The Town of Oakville is reminding residents that as part of the Health Canada Pest Management Regulatory Agency’s registration approval of the natural bio-insecticide TreeAzin, the deadline to treat ash trees from the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is August 31. After that, residents will have to wait until spring. To date, Oakville has treated all 2,659 public ash trees scheduled for treatment this year and continues to encourage residents to follow suit.

“Oakville is doing its part to save our urban forest. We have set ambitious canopy coverage targets and I expect that we’ll reach them with the support of the community,” Oakville Mayor Rob Burton said. “Feedback tells us that residents are treating their ash trees. I hope our work inspires other municipalities to fight back.”

With almost 180,000 ash trees at risk, the town recently launched the Oakville Canopy Club, an innovative community outreach program to encourage residents to save Oakville’s tree canopy from the threat of EAB. Eighty per cent of Oakville’s treatable ash tree canopy is on private property.

In order to track the success of the Oakville Canopy Club, homeowners are encouraged to notify the Town of Oakville if they have treated, removed or planted a tree this summer by emailing their name and address to canopyclub@oakville.ca, calling 905-845-6601, ext. 3467 or visiting the EAB web page.

“Qualified service providers will let you know if your ash tree should be treated now or if it can wait until the spring,” John McNeil, manager of Forestry Services said. “The cost for injections ranges by vendor, and the size, location and health of the tree. Make sure you get multiple quotes and do your research.”

Oakville’s approximately 5,900 street and park ash trees that qualified for treatment had a trunk Diameter at Breast Height (DBH) of at least 20 centimetres; wood condition of at least fair; and crown condition of at least fair (poor is more than 30 per cent crown die-back).

To learn more about the Oakville Canopy Club, treatment options and what Oakville’s doing to manage EAB, visit the EAB web page, visit us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

via August is last month to treat ash trees until spring.

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